EASA non-commercial complex aircraft operations (EASA Part-NCC).

EASA Air Operations Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Part-NCC applies to non-commercial flights in complex motor-powered aircraft.

EASA Part-NCC applies now

EASA Part-NCC requires each operator to follow the same essential requirements as commercial air transport operators but the rules are proportionate – instead of holding an AOC, UK based operators must submit a declaration to us about their operation – regardless of where the aircraft is registered. The declaration will help us to establish and maintain the required oversight programme for Part-NCC aircraft. All affected operators must follow the new rules from 25 August 2016.

In this short video below, James Scott, Postholder Flight Operations / Crew Training, explains more about Part-NCC and how we can help you gain and maintain approval.




Am I affected?

If you fly complex motor powered non-commercial aircraft then yes your are affected.

  • an aircraft that is registered in an EASA State; or,
  • an aircraft that is registered in a non-EASA State but where the operator is established or residing in an EASA State.

 

Do I have a complex motor powered aircraft?

The definition is an aircraft:

  • with a maximum certified take off mass exceeding 5700kg; or
  • certified for a maximum passenger seating configuration of more than 19; or
  • certified for operation with a minimum crew of two pilots; or
  • equipped with a turbojet engine; or
  • equipped with more than one turboprop engine exceeding 5700kg.

 

a helicopter:

  • certified for a maximum take-off mass exceeding 3175kg; or
  • certified for a maximum passenger seating configuration of more than nine; or
  • certified for operation with a minimum crew of two pilots

 

a tilt rotor aircraft.

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EASA Part-NCC: If affected, what do I need to do?

If you are affected you need to understand the rules and ensure you are in compliance. Therefore operators must:
  • Have operations manual(s)
  • Employ a management system
  • Submit to the CAA (or other regional body) details of the aircraft type, all operational and continuing airworthiness arrangements, approvals held along with all other relevant information.


Once compliant if you are resident or your principal place of business is based in the UK must make a declaration to the CAA.